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Showing posts from November, 2015

The Weather War: UN Report Shows Toll of Climate Change

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On 23 November, just a week before the opening of COP 21, the Climate Change Conference in Paris, the United Nations issued a fascinating (and scary) report showing the unexpected toll of climate change over the past 20 years (see here). The author of the report is the UN's office for disaster risk reduction (UNISDR). Headquartered in Geneva with 5 regional offices, UNISDR is an organizational unit of the UN Secretariat, headed by Margareta Wahlström and tasked to support the implementation, follow-up and review of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 that was adoped by UN Member States in Japan in March 2015.


Did you know that over the past twenty years, since the first Climate Change Conference (COP1) in 1995, over 600,000 people have lost their lives and over 4 billion have been injured  in weather-related events? Losses to property are of course commensurate and enormous: 87 million homes were damaged or destroyed over the period of the survey; the total …

The Key for Peace: The Indispensable Role of the United Nations

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Once again, one of my articles, just published on Impakter, with a remarkable introduction from the Editor (he is a millennial, a man deeply concerned about the issues of our time, value-driven like his whole generation, and this too is reason for hope in a better future). This is the beginning, to read the rest, go on Impakter, click here.




THE KEY FOR PEACE: THE INDISPENSABLE ROLE OF THE UNITED NATIONS on 16 November, 2015 at 19:00 Note from the Editor:In these hours, following the tragic killing of innocents in Paris and Beirut,  our thoughts are with the people of France and Lebanon. Impakter is a global publication. Our team comes from every corner of our beloved World. We represent the citizens of the World. Furthermore, our aim is to express that through this publication. Today we want this thought to reach higher than ever before.  We believe that the current events taking place during the G20 could potentially be a significant milestone in our human history. A unpr…

Climate Fiction Update, it's Now Eco-Fiction

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The thread discussing climate fiction on the top-rated SFF World website is still on-going! If you haven't read it yet, click here to see it. It has now veered to discussing what makes for a good story based on  an eco-fiction premise. And here I thought the thread had been winding down! But it hasn't, you're still in time to join the discussion and post your comment.  I'd even posted this comment that I thought would be my last:

I do hope that one lasting result of this excellent debate on SFFWorld is that we can put to rest the discussion around cli-fi vs. climate fiction vs. eco-fiction! 

I vote for eco-fiction, particularly since it has shown to have proven historical antecedents - wow, back to 1971, as Burt pointed out, and with a string of big names from Asimov to Vonnegut to Steinbeck...That's impressive and yes, I would certainly also sign on to that pitch Burt quotes: 
"Eco-Fiction is a provocative and poignant collection of short stories that issue a p…

Climate Change and the Price of Survival

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BOOK REVIEW - BACK TO THE GARDEN, by Clara Hume, published by Moon Willow Press (2013) Available on Amazon, click here

BREAKING NEWS: On the forum of top-seeded SFFWorld, there's an on-going debate on climate fiction where Clara Hume intervenes as Guest Host, using her real name, Mary Woodbury, along with two more Guest Hosts, Brian Burt, author of theAquarius Risingtrilogy and myself under my pen name Claude Nougat. To see or join this stimulating debate now, click here.

Climate change usually inspires the direst of dystopian fiction: end-of-the-world situations, cities under water, people desperately seeking safety and fighting for survival while children and the elderly are the first to die...With Clara Hume's Back to the Garden, you get that but you also get much more and something that is very different.


You get a breath of fresh air, a glimpse of hope even though in that book, as in all other climate fiction novels I've ever read, the world is overheated and overrun wi…